The Manhattan Project

Manhattan Project Voices

Voices of the Manhattan ProjectSpecial Engineering Detachment insignia

Voices of the Manhattan Project is a joint project by the Atomic Heritage Foundation and the Los Alamos Historical Society to create a public archive of our oral history collections of Manhattan Project veterans and their families. The Manhattan Project was a great human collaboration, with 130,000 people around the country working on the top-secret project. We are currently in the process of adding many more oral histories to the website, so check back frequently to view new interviews! 

We are still conducting interviews with Manhattan Project veterans and their families, to capture as many oral histories as possible. If you are, or know, a Manhattan Project veteran who would like to be interviewed, please contact us.

Recent Oral Histories

Irénée Du Pont, Jr.'s Interview (2014)

Irénée Du Pont, Jr. was a member of the DuPont Company’s Executive Committee and is the son of Irénée Du Pont, president of the DuPont Company from 1919-1925. He was also the brother-in-law of Crawford Greenewalt, who coordinated the DuPont Company’s involvement with the Manhattan Project. In this interview, Irénée discusses the history of the DuPont Company, from its early work making gunpowder to the invention of nylon. He describes how the company became one of the key civilian contractors for the Manhattan Project.

Denise Kiernan's Interview

Denise Kiernan has worked as a journalist and producer. She is best known for "The Girls of Atomic City," which came out in March 2013 and immediately shot to the top of the New York Times bestsellers list. "The Girls of Atomic City" tells the story of the women who worked at Oak Ridge on the Manhattan Project. She has appeared on the Daily Show and NPR to talk about her book and the women who worked on the Manhattan Project.

J. Robert Oppenheimer's Interview

In this interview, Robert Oppenheimer talks about the organization of the Manhattan Project and some of the scientists that he helped to recruit during the earliest days of the project. Oppenheimer also talks about some of the biggest difficulties that scientists faced during the project, such as developing a sound method for implosion.

Herman Snyder's Interview

Herman Snyder worked on the Manhattan Project at Oak Ridge as a soldier in the Special Engineer Detachment. He worked at the K-25 Plant for many years, and later at the Y-12 Plant. He discusses the many innovations that caused K-25 to run so smoothly and to be built so quickly. Snyder also reminisces about the sense of community at Oak Ridge, and recalls having to scrounge a pass to get his new bride through the gates into Oak Ridge.