The Manhattan Project

Working Conditions

Fred Hunt's Interview

Hunt: I started working for DuPont in 1937 at Old Hickory [in Tennessee] in the power department. I was very anxious to do the best I could, so I made a special effort to learn everything.

Where were you when you were told to return to Wilmington?

Hunt: At that point I was a power superintendent at Childersburg Ordnance.

That was in Alabama?

Hunt: In Alabama.

When did you find out about Hanford?

Bob Caron's Tape to Joe Papalia

Bob Caron: Oh, now for comments on Bob Lewis. I do not know what the hell to say about that, Joe. Bob calls me fairly frequently on his WATS [Wide Area Telephone Service] line, and I kind of feel like I am in the middle of something. He is very bitter, and very bitter towards [Paul] Tibbets. How justified it is I am just not sure. I do not know really the whole story. Bob is very emphatic when he tells his side of the story. When I mention some things, he just tells me, “Oh, you are too damn naïve.” Well, I know I am. Always have been.

John W. Healy's Interview

John Healy: Hello.

S. L. Sanger: Hello this is Mr. Sanger from Seattle, is this a good time to talk about Hanford, or no.

Healy: Another one you may want to talk to is Carl Garmertsfelder in Knoxville.

Sanger: In Knoxville, now what was his position? Oregonian said he was a radiation control manager.

Healy: It has been so long. I do not really remember. I worked for Carl for a while, and he reported to Herb Parker.

Ray Gallagher and Fred Olivi's Interview - Part 1

Announcer: Here is your host and moderator, Milton Rosenberg.

Milton Rosenberg: Our guests tonight all know a great deal about the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but from different vantage points, two of them from the vantage point of being up in the air and helping to drop the bombs. They are Fred Olivi, who was the co-pilot of Bockscar. That was the plane that actually delivered the bomb to Nagasaki.

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