The Manhattan Project

Working Conditions

Robert E. Hayes's Interview

Alexandra Levy: All right, we are here today on July 18, 2014 in New Jersey with Robert Hayes. My first question for you is to please say your name and to spell it.

Robert Hayes: Robert, R-O-B-E-R-T, E, Hayes, H-A-Y-E-S.

Levy: Can you tell me a little bit about when and where you were born and grew up?

Phil Gardner's Interview

Stephane Groueff: So, you were in charge of recruiting for Hanford or generally for DuPont?

Phil Gardner: No, I had one section of it. The country was really split up into four parts at the time I became connected with it. That was in May of 1944 – four different people were sent out to head up recruitment in different sections. One was up on the Northeastern part, one was down in the Southwest. One was in here, and one was in the Chicago Area, that is right in the East here.

James R. Chapman

James R. Chapman worked on the Manhattan Project for Stone and Webster, which helped build the Y-12 Plant. He talks about his work at Oak Ridge, and especially the time pressure that the project faced and the speed with which he and his fellow engineers worked. He also discusses the day-to-day lives of scientists working at Oak Ridge.

William Lowe's Interview

William Lowe:  I was born in Bartlesville, Oklahoma in the year 1920. Within a few years, my parents had moved to Westfield, New Jersey, where I grew up. But upon reaching 18, I went to college at Purdue University. It was 700 miles from home. By train, it took a day. 

I would say that my 93 years have been dominated by atomic bombs, war, in particular World War II, and later by people uses of atomic energy. What I will do is try to convey, more or less chronologically, what happened.

K. W. Greager's Interview

[Interviewed by Cynthia Kelly and Tom Zannes.]

K.W. Greager: Name is K.W. Greager, I go by Wally. Greager is spelled G-R-E-A-G-E-R, slightly different than the earlier Greager.

Tell us about when you started with Hanford.

Greager: I started working at Hanford after college in late 1951 on a rotational training program. I spent four years in the 300 Area—fuel preparation, slug preparation. I wound up out in the 100 Areas, the reactor areas, in 1956-57 time period. 

Haskell Sheinberg's Interview

Cindy Kelly: My name is Cindy Kelly, it is Wednesday, July 31st, 2013, and I’m here with Haskell Sheinberg. And the first question to him is, please tell us your name and spell it.

Haskell Sheinberg: My name is Haskell Sheinberg. And the first name is H-A-S-K-E-L-L, last name S-H-E-I-N-B-E-R-G.

Kelly: Perfect. 

Sheinberg: I haven’t lost that much memory anyway.

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