The Manhattan Project

Women in Science

Irene LaViolette's Interview

Cindy Kelly: Let’s start by having you tell us your name and spelling it.

Irene LaViolette: I’m Irene LaViolette.

Kelly: And how do you spell that? Can you spell your name?

LaViolette: I-R-E-N-E; V middle initial, LaViolette, L-A-V-I-O-L-E-T-T-E. 

Kelly: Great. Today’s date is February 13, 2013. My name is Cindy Kelly and we’re here at the offices of the Atomic Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. Can you tell me what does the “V” stand for, your middle name?

David Hall's Interview

[At top is the edited version of the interview published by S. L. Sanger in Working on the Bomb: An Oral History of WWII Hanford, Portland State University, 1995.

For the full transcript that matches the audio of the interview, please scroll down.]

Book version:

Evelyne Litz's Interview

Alexandra Levy: We’re here on December 28, 2012 with Evelyne Litz. Please say your name and spell it.

Evelyne Litz: Evelyne Litz, E-V-E-L-Y-N-E, L-I-T-Z.

Levy: So where are you from originally?

Litz: Chicago.

Levy: And how did you become involved in the Manhattan Project?

Kay Manley's Interview

Theresa Strottman:  It’s Saturday, February 15, 1992, approximately 11:28 AM.  We’re interviewing Kay Manley.  We really appreciate your coming here today.   Briefly tell me when and where you were born and something about your education and training.

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