The Manhattan Project

Civilian Life

Dolores Heaton's Interview

Alexandra Levy: This is December 29, 2013. We are here with Dolores Heaton in Florida. This is Alexandra Levy with the Atomic Heritage Foundation. My first question is to please say your name and to spell it. 

Dolores Heaton: Dolores Heaton, D-O-L-O-R-E-S H-E-A-T-O-N. 

Levy: Could you tell us a little bit about where and when you were born?

Helen Jernigan's Interview

Cindy Kelly: My name is Kelly. I am with the Atomic Heritage Foundation. And I am in Oak Ridge, Tennessee today, which is Friday, September 6, 2013. And we are very fortunate today to have Helen Jernigan. And I am going to start by asking Helen to say her name and spell it.

Helen Jernigan: Jernigan. H-E-L-E-N, J-E-R-N-I-G-A-N.

Theodore Rockwell's Interview

 

Well I was very young at the time. I went down there in 1943, down to Oak Ridge, TN.   They were interviewing at Princeton where I was going to school. They guys said that they had a very important war project going on down there. And I said, “Oh what’s it all about?” 

And they said, “Oh, we can’t tell you what it’s all about.”

So I said, “Gee, why should I go at a place if you can’t tell me what it’s all about.”  

Gwen Groves Robinson's Interview

Cindy Kelly: Okay, I am Cindy Kelly, Atomic Heritage Foundation. It is Sunday July 7th, 20 13 and I am in Scarborough, Maine, with Gwen Groves Robinson. And the first question I am going to ask her is to tell us her name and to spell it.

Gwen Robinson: To spell my name? It is Gwen Groves Robinson just as you said. G-R-O-V-E-S, R-O-B-I-N-S-O-N.

Roy Glauber's Interview

Cindy Kelly: I am Cindy Kelly, the date is June 6, 2013, and we are here with Dr. Roy Glauber. And your first question is to tell me your name and spell it. Tough one, start with a tough one.

Glauber: I probably cannot even spell it! I am Roy Glauber and that is spelled G-L-A-U-B-E-R, and that is a good old German name.

Ellen Bradbury Reid's Interview

Cindy Kelly: I am Cindy Kelly with Atomic Heritage Foundation and it is Wednesday, July 31, 2013 and I am with Ellen Bradbury Reid. My first question for Ellen is to please tell us your name and spell it. 

Ellen Bradbury Reid: Ellen Bradbury Reid. Actually I was Ellen Wilder, and then I married John Bradbury and then eventually married Ed Reid so it is E-l-l-e-n, B-r-a-d-b-u-r-y, R-e-i-d. 

William Sweeney's Interview

[Interviewed by S. L. Sanger, from Working on the Bomb: An Oral History of WWII Hanford, Portland State University, 1995]

After I left Massachusetts, I was stationed in Spokane and after that I went to Republic, up in the mines. In July, 1943, then, I was sent down here by the bishop when Hanford was just starting. Like he said at the time, I don't know what they're doing down there but you go down and take care of us.

Lloyd Wiehl's Interview

[Interviewed by Robert W. Mull, from S.L. Sanger's Working on the Bomb: An Oral History of WWII Hanford, Portland State University, 1995]

It came like a bombshell. They announced they were taking the whole valley. For what? We didn't know. At that time, the farmers were short of money and didn't have any place to go, really. So eventually the government appraised it and put the money in escrow for the landowners to draw on. This was esti­mated as their just compensation.

Kathleen Hitchock's Interview

[Interviewed by Robert W. Mull, from S.L. Sanger's Working on the Bomb: An Oral History of WWII Hanford, Portland State University, 1995]

We came from the Waterville area. My parents moved down to White Bluffs to develop a fruit orchard. They bought a 10-acre place that had been planted to apples. They really pioneered. This had to have been 1910.

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